Home Journal
E-mail Print
Acoustics Australia Logo (3032 bytes)

Vol 36 No 3

CONTENTS

December 2008


ARTICLES

A review of bimodal binaural hearing systems and fitting
Peter John Blamey and Elaine Saunders
PDF Full Paper

Active noise control at a moving virtual sensor in three-dimensions
Danielle Moreau, Ben Cazzolato and Anthony Zander
PDF Full Paper

Transmission loss of a panel with an array of tuned vibration absorbers
Carl Q. Howard
PDF Full Paper

Interlude
Code of Ethics
Sustaining Members
News
New Products
Divisional News
Meeting Reports
Future Meetings
FASTS
Book Review
Diary
New Members
Acoustics Australia Information
Advertisers Index


A REVIEW OF BIMODAL BINAURAL HEARING SYSTEMS AND FITTING

Peter John Blamey1, 2 and Elaine Saunders1
1 Dynamic Hearing Pty Ltd, 2 Chapel Street, Richmond, Vic 3121, Australia
2 Department of Otolaryngology, The University of Melbourne
* Electronic Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Vol. 36, No. 3 pp 87 - 91 (2008)
ABSTRACT: Cochlear implants and hearing aids are both suitable for use by people with severe to profound hearing loss (greater than 70 dB HL), and the 'bimodal' combination of one of each device in opposite ears has become a commonly recommended option. This paper reviews some of the experimental evidence assessing the performance of bimodal hearing. To obtain the best bimodal performance, it is recommended that both devices are fitted together; that loudness of the two devices is balanced for a wide range of input levels; that the signal to noise ratio is maximised in each ear separately; that speech should be presented to both ears; and noise should be presented to one ear only if possible.

ACTIVE NOISE CONTROL AT A MOVING VIRTUAL SENSOR IN THREE-DIMENSIONS

Danielle Moreau, Ben Cazzolato and Anthony Zander
School of Mechanical Engineering
The University of Adelaide
Adelaide SA 5005 Australia

Vol. 36, No. 3 pp 93 - 96 (2008)
ABSTRACT: A common problem in local active noise control is that the zone of quiet generated at the physical error sensor is limited in size. This requires that the physical error sensor (the microphone) is placed at the desired location of attenuation (the ear), which is often inconvenient. Virtual acoustic sensors overcome this by estimating the pressure at a location that is remote from the physical sensor and therefore, when combined with an active noise control system, generate a zone of quiet at the desired location of attenuation. While virtual acoustic sensors have shown potential to improve the performance of local active noise control systems, it is, however, likely that the desired location of attenuation is not spatially fixed. A method for generating a virtual sensor that tracks a three-dimensional trajectory in a three-dimensional sound field is summarised in this paper. The performance of an active noise control system in generating a zone of quiet at the ear of a rotating head in a three-dimensional cavity has been experimentally investigated and the results included here demonstrate that moving virtual sensors provide improved attenuation compared to fixed virtual sensors or fixed physical sensors.

TRANSMISSION LOSS OF A PANEL WITH AN ARRAY OF TUNED VIBRATION ABSORBERS

Carl Q. Howard
School of Mechanical Engineering, The University
of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia

Vol. 36, No. 3 pp 98 - 103 (2008)
ABSTRACT: This paper presents a numerical model for the calculation of the transmission loss of a panel with an array of tuned vibration absorbers attached. The transmission loss of the panel is calculated for the case of the bare panel, with tuned vibration absorbers attached, and equivalent blocking masses. The theoretical predictions of transmission loss are compared with experimental measurements.

 

Newsflash

PROPOSED INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF SOUND 2019

Let's make 2019 the International Year of Sound!

Click here to see draft prospectus. Suggestions for major activities that would be truly international to strengthen the application are welcomed.

 

ACOUSTICS 2017

Perth, Western Australia 19-22 November 2017