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Vol 30 No 3

CONTENTS

December 2002


ARTICLES

Bandicoot --- A Novel Approach to using a Pitch-Catch Acoustic Probe for Field Non-destructive Testing
L.P. Dickinson and S. Thwaites
PDF Full Paper

Improved Noise Management for the Building Industry
M. Burgess and J. Lai
PDF Full Paper

Recording the Operatic Voice for Acoustic Analysis
D. Cabrera, P Davis, J. Barnes, M. Jacobs and D. Bell
PDF Full Paper

Condenser Microphones -- A Tutorial
N. Fletcher
PDF Full Paper

Road Traffic Noise -- the Selection of a Preferred Route
Neil Gross
PDF Full Paper

Book Reviews
AAS Council
Future Meetings
Meeting Reports
New Members
Standards Australia
FASTS
Letters
New Products
Diary
Acoustics Australia Information
Australian Acoustical Society Information
Advertisers Index


BANDICOOT A NOVEL APPROACH TO USING A PITCH-CATCH ACOUSTIC PROBE FOR FIELD NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING

Laurence P. Dickinson & Suszanne Thwaites
CSIRO Telecommunication and Industrial Physics, Sydney

Vol. 30, No. 3 pp 93 - 96 (2002)
ABSTRACT: The acoustic Pitch-Catch probe is commonplace in the world of aerospace non-destructive testing for the location of defects within a composite sandwich panel. However the usefulness of the technique is lacking in many respects, being cumbersome to use and generally very costly. Building on several years of experience, a new approach has been taken by CSIRO to produce a simple and versatile system that incorporates an optimised Pitch-Catch probe within an optical computer mouse and combined with a notebook computer, to provide a fully featured scanning system for a fraction of the cost of systems currently available. This paper describes the approach taken and some of the underlying research in developing the Bandicoot.

An earlier version of this paper was presented at the 2001 AAS Annual Converence, Canberra, November 21-23, 2001

IMPROVED NOISE MANAGEMENT FOR THE BUILDING INDUSTRY

Marion Burgess and Joseph Lai
Acoustics and Vibration Unit, School of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering
The University of New South Wales at The Australian Defence Force Academy,
Canberra, ACT 2600

Vol. 30, No. 3 pp 97 - 101 (2002)
ABSTRACT: There is great potential for excessive noise exposure for workers in the general building industry as not only can the individual tools and equipment produce high noise levels but also the worker is usually close to the source of the noise. Effective noise management procedures are required to minimise the loss of hearing of workers on building sites. This paper reports on a project sponsored by WorkCover NSW for which the aims included identification of a baseline of current noise exposure levels on a representative range of building sites, assessment of the extent of the implementation of noise management codes on building sites and suggestions for strategies for improved implementation.

RECORDING THE OPERATIC VOICE FOR ACOUSTIC ANALYSIS

Densil Cabrera*, Pamela Davis**, Jennifer Barnes**, Margaret Jacobs*** and David Bell**
*School of Architecture, Design Science and Planning,
**The Conservatorium of Music
***Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney NSW 2006,

Vol. 30, No. 3 pp 103 - 108 (2002)
ABSTRACT: This paper considers a number of factors related to the recording of the voices of operatic singers for acoustic analysis. We wanted to develop a technique for recording these singers in non-anechoic environments so we tested head-mounted microphones. We tested their effectiveness in recording the direct sound produced by the singer with relatively little interference from the reflections of the sound in the recording environment. We examined the effectiveness of various near-field microphone positions using a head and torso simulator in anechoic conditions and applied these observations to recording an operatic soprano, comparing the head-mounted and reference microphones. We also determined, that, for this singer, there was appreciable movement of the head and body during operatic singing, even when the singer tried to avoid moving.

CONDENSER MICROPHONES - TUTORIAL

Neville Fletcher
Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering
Australian National University
Canberra ACT 0200

Vol. 30, No. 3 pp 109 - 113 (2002)
ABSTRACT: This tutorial discusses the operation of several types of condenser microphone including standard omnidirectional measuring microphones, simple cardioid microphones, and studio microphones with adjustable response pattern. The physics underlying their operation is discussed, and the approach to a detailed analysis using electrical network analogs is outlined.

ACOUSTIC FORUM
ROAD TRAFFIC NOISE - THE SELECTION OF A PREFERRED ROUTE

Neil Gross
Wilkinson Murray Pty Limited, 123 Willoughby Road,
Crows Nest NSW 2065

Vol. 30, No. 3 pp 115 - 116 (2002)

 

Newsflash

PROPOSED INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF SOUND 2019

Let's make 2019 the International Year of Sound!

Click here to see draft prospectus. Suggestions for major activities that would be truly international to strengthen the application are welcomed.

 

ACOUSTICS 2017

Perth, Western Australia 19-22 November 2017