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Vol 28 No 2

CONTENTS

August 2000


ARTICLES

Atmospheric Infrasound
A. Bedard Jr. and T. Georges
PDF Full Paper

The Physiological Demands on Wind Instrument Performance
N. Fletcher
PDF Full Paper

Science and the Stradivarius
C. Gough
PDF Full Paper

CONSULTING NOTE

Solving a Baffling Problem at Warringah Aquatic Centre
J. Andrew and D. Pritchett
PDF Full Paper

Books
News
New Members
Letter
New Products
Diary
Acoustics Australia Information
Australian Acoustical Society Information
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ATMOSPHERIC INFRASOUND

?Alfred J. Bedard Jr.1 and Thomas M. Georges2
1 National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations's Environmental Technology Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado.
2 NOAA/Colorado State university Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, also in Boulder
Reprinted, with permission, from Physics Today 53, 32-37 (2000). Copyright 2000, American Institute of Physics

Vol. 28, No. 2 pp 47-52 (2000)
ABSTRACT: The search for ways to monitor compliance with the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty has sparked renewed interest in sounds with frequencies too low for humans to hear.

THE PHYSIOLOGICAL DEMANDS OF WIND INSTRUMENT PERFORMANCE

Neville H. Fletcher
Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering Australian National University, Canberra 0200

Originally published as "Les exigences physiologique lors du jou des instruments a vent" in Medecine des Arts (2000).

Science and the Stradivarius

Vol. 28, No. 2 pp 53-56 (2000)
ABSTRACT: Requirements on blowing pressure and lip tension in playing of woodwind and brass instruments are examined and related to the sound-producing mechanism in each case. Loud playing of high notes on brass instruments is found to be the most physiologically demanding situation, but all instruments have particular requirements for precise physiological control.

Colin Gough
School of Physics and Astronomy
University of Birmingham
Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT
email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Vol. 28, No. 2 pp 57-64 (2000)
ABSTRACT: Stradivarius violins are among the most sought-after musical instruments in the world. But is there a secret that makes a Stradivarius sound so good, and can modern violins match the wonderful tonal quality of this great Italian instrument?


CONSULTING NOTE

SOLVING A BAFFLING PROBLEM AT WARRINGAH AQUATIC CENTRE

John Andrew1 and David Pritchett2

1 PKA Acoustic Consulting
Suite 103, 220 Pacific Highway, Crows Nest NSW 2065

2 David Pritchett Pty Ltd, 40 Cambourne Avenue, St Ives NSW 2075

Vol. 28, No. 2 pp 65-67 (2000)
ABSTRACT: Warringah Aquatic Centre has for 20 years been a major sporting and recreation drawcard for tens of thousands of people on the lower north shore and lower northern beaches of Sydney. Noise reverberation has always been a concern at the Centre, even though baffles were installed in the concrete ceiling about 15 years ago. When the baffles began to deteriorate over the past couple of years, the situation became critical. This article describes how the problem was overcome, in spite of considerable challenges.

 

Newsflash

PROPOSED INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF SOUND 2019

Let's make 2019 the International Year of Sound!

Click here to see draft prospectus. Suggestions for major activities that would be truly international to strengthen the application are welcomed.

 

ACOUSTICS 2017

Perth, Western Australia 19-22 November 2017